Rutherford County Schools

Skip to main content
Main Menu Toggle

Testing FAQ

Questions

1) What is TCAP?
2) When does TCAP-Achievement take place?
3) Where can I find TCAP prep resources for my students?
4) What do I need to know about accommodations for special populations?
5) How are students at the alternative school tested?
6) What happens if a student has to leave during the test?
7) Can my students use highlighters or write in the book?
8) Can teachers give scrap paper to students divided into quadrants?
9) Must I cover all the material on my walls?
10) Will achievement test results count as a part of the grade for the year in grades 3 – 8?
11) What is a quick score, and how do quick scores relate to grades?
12) Are quick score numeric grades representative of a student’s percentile on the test?
13) What is NAEP?
Answers

1) Q: What is TCAP?
A: TCAP is the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program. It is not a specific test but rather a program comprised of several different tests including Grade 2, Social Studies and US History, Science and TNReady which consists of Readling, Language Arts and Mathematics.
2) Q: When does TCAP/TNReady take place?
A: All Rutherford County students in grades 2-8 or enrolled in an EOC course will take their State assessments during the Spring window (April 15-May 8, 2020).
 
3) Q: Where can I find TCAP prep resources for my students?
A: The State Department of Education has grade-specific Achievement practice tests and item samplers.

4)  Q: What do I need to know about accommodations for special populations?
A: There are English Language Learner Accommodations, Allowable Accommodations, as well as Special Accommodations available. Allowable accommodations are available for every student. Examples are flexible setting, flexible scheduling and visual/tactile aids. Some students who are eligible for Special Education services may have special accommodations described in their IEP. Those are unique to each student. Failure to provide these accommodations could result in scores being invalid. Be sure that you understand clearly which accommodations are scheduled for each of your students.

5)  Q: How are students at the alternative school tested?
A: Students at the alternative schools are assumed to be a part of their remanding school. Daniel McKee and Smyrna West are considered to be “extensions” of the remanding school. 

6) Q: What happens if a student has to leave during the test?
A: Official time will stop if a student gets sick during testing and begins once they return. If a student is unable to return that day, they will not be allowed to finish and therefore will not receive a score.  For those who are unable to finish their test, a district created assessment is available for those who need a score to complete their second semester grade. Please contact the district assessment director for more information.

7) Q: Can my students use highlighters or write in the book?
A: Yes.  Only a yellow highlighter can be used.
 
8) Q: Can teachers give scrap paper to students divided into quadrants?
A: Scrap Paper must be clean (nothing on it) and can be graph. If scrap paper has been divided into quadrants then it becomes a graphic organizer which would give one group of students an advantage over another group of students that are not provided the same item. Graphic organizers cannot be used on the Achievement Test. Students may, however, create their own graphic organizer.
 
9) Q: Must I cover all the material on my walls?
A: Probably not.  However, learning strategies or information that students need to be able to recall independently in order to determine mastery should not be visible during a state test.
10)  Q: Will achievement test results count as a part of the grade?
A: Yes. They will count 15% of the students' final average in grades 3-8 and End of Course (EOC) exams for 2019-2020. 
11) Q: What is a quick score, and how do quick scores relate to grades?
A: Quick scores are calculated using a simple mathematical procedure. For each student on each test, the raw score number correct is converted to a numeric grade scale score. The conversion occurs using raw score performance level cuts to proficiency levels and numeric grade cuts. The cut levels are specific to each subject and grade. This grade scale is based on the State Board of Education approved numeric grade scale. NOTE: It is statistically possible for two students to have the same grade score and two different proficiency levels due to rounding!

12) Q: Are quick score numeric grades representative of a student’s percentile on the test?
A: No, quick score numeric grades convert a raw score performance level cut to a numeric grade without taking into account a student’s percentile on the test. The cut scores are specific to each subject and grade. The numeric grade is a reflection only of the student’s performance relative to the cut score.

13)  Q: What is NAEP?
A: The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is the largest continuing and nationally representative assessment of what our nation's students know and can do. It has served as a national yardstick of student achievement since 1969. Through The Nation's Report Card, NAEP informs the public about what America's students know and can do in various subject areas, and compares achievement between states, large urban districts, and various student demographic groups.  Participating schools are chosen randomly. See more...